Bleeding Disorders and Mouth Bleeds

Bleeding Disorders and Mouth Bleeds

If you have a bleeding disorder or are caring for someone with a bleeding disorder, you understand that accidents involving the mouth can happen, no matter how hard you try to prevent them. When bumps, falls, and collisions occur, here's what you may want to consider doing:

Bleeding Disorder Care: Losing A Tooth

If you lose a permanent tooth in an accident, pick up the tooth by the crown, avoiding the roots. Rinse the tooth off in clean cold water and place it in milk, if possible. Hurry to a dentist or emergency room; it may be possible to reinsert the tooth. On the way to the dentist, apply firm pressure to the bleeding site with a piece of clean gauze.

Head Directly to the Emergency Room if:1

  • the bleeding on your tongue, cheek, or floor of the mouth doesn't stop
  • your tongue, throat, or neck is swollen or bruised
  • you are having trouble breathing or swallowing

Bleeding Disorder Care: After the Bleeding has Stopped

Once the bleeding has stopped, follow your dentist's recommendation regarding wound care. Should bleeding reoccur, notify your dentist or Hemophilia Treatment Center. It may help to eat soft, cold foods. And remember, no straws—the sucking can restart bleeding.

Tip for preventing mouth bleeds: People with a bleeding disorder should always wear mouth guards when they play sports. More tips can be found on Canadian Hemophilia Society website, in "All About Hemophilia" guide, chapter 4. Available at http://www.hemophilia.ca/en/educational-material/printed-documents/hemophilia/. Accessed January 26, 2017.

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NOTE:

Reference

Bleeding Disorders and Mouth Bleeds

Tips for bleeding disorder oral care if you lose a tooth or have a mouth bleed.